Jerusalem Synagogue

opening hours

Open daily except of Saturdays and Jewish holidays

10:00-17:00

6.5. a 7.5. CLOSED

 

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Jeruzalémská 7
Prague 1

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entrance fees

Adults

150 CZK
(eTicket 135 CZK)

Children under 6

free

Children under 15 and
students

100 CZK
(eTicket 90 CZK)


Reduced entrance fee for visitors with valid ticket to the Jewish Town sites:

Adults

100 CZK

Children under 6

free

Children under 15 and
students

80 CZK

About the synagogue

The synagogue was built between 1905–1906 by a Viennese architect and an Imperial construction supervisor Wilhelm Stiassny, as a replacement for three Synagogues (the Zigeiner, the Velkodvorská, and the New) destroyed in the years 1898-1906 during the redevelopment. Although the association which took up the challenge of building the Synagogue was founded in 1896, it took ten years before the Synagogue was inaugurated on 16 September 1906. Initially it bore the name of the Jubilee Temple of Emperor Franz Joseph to commemorate the 50th anniversary of his reign, in 1898. After WWI, the present name, the Jerusalem Synagogue, based on the street name where it stands, slowly gained ground. The street name has nothing to do with the Synagogue, however: the street is named after the Church of Jerusalem former chapel of St Henry, nearby.

The Jerusalem Synagogue is distinctive in that it is one of only eight Synagogues built to W. Stiassny’s design, where services are still held. The only interlude was during the war years 1941–1945, when it acted as a repository of seized Jewish property.

Besides its religious role, the Synagogue is a cultural and exhibition venue. The concerts regularly held here let visitors listen to the uniquely preserved original organ by Emanuel Stephen Peter.

Exhibitions

plakat

The exhibition of photographs titled "Behind the Curtain" presents a part of Jindřich Svátek's photographic work, which was created between 1983 and 1991 within the environment of the Prague Jewish community.

During the totalitarian régime, when all religious communities were under scrutiny of the State Security, gaining access to this community was challenging. The photographs were taken only during limited times, when, according to halachic laws, photographing was allowed. Consequently, images depicting events such as the Sabbath or High Holidays are notably absent. The photographs mostly originate from occasions such as weddings, funerals, Hanukkah and Purim parties, or morning services, which took place on weekdays or Sundays.

In the pictures, we see representatives of the Prague community, as well as members of the artistic scene who visited the community—friends, acquaintances, parents, and random event participants. This resulted in a remarkable historical document and, simultaneously, a collection of artistically high-quality photographs.